DEPORTABLE OFFENSES

Under certain circumstances, any non-citizen, even with legal status,

can be deported. Deportability is a judgment about whether specific

immigration laws have been broken – specifically § 237 of the

Immigration and Nationality Act.

A person can become deportable in a variety of ways. A non-citizen

is deportable for being in the United States without status, for example.

"Deportable offenses" are crimes or behaviors that have earned you

a conviction(s). In Immigration Court, deportable offenses lead to

deportation proceedings. It's worth noting that most non-citizens

have the legal right to contest allegations of deportability in the

Immigration Court. However, a conviction for certain classifications

of deportable offenses may prevent someone from being stopped from

leaving the United States.

In Atlanta, the following crimes are deportable:

Stalking, Violation of Protection Order, and Child Abuse (often misdemeanors)

Crimes Involving Moral Turpitude:

 

· Crimes of violence

· Firearms offenses

· Controlled substances offenses

· Fraud/Deceit in which the loss to the victim is greater than $10,000

Aggravated Felony:

 

· Crimes of violence

· Firearms offenses

· Controlled substances offenses

· Fraud/Deceit in which the loss to the victim is greater than $10,000

Controlled Substances Offenses

Offenses for Possession of a Firearm

Subsections A through F of INA § 237 list other deportable offenses

that are not covered by the preceding subsections.

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